BLOG #02 – ISE JINGU

SENGU & THE JAPANESE
Chapter 2. Shinto Shrine, the Place to Respect Nature

Shintoism originated 15,000 years ago during the Jomon period of Japan. There are no identifiable founders, no printed doctrine, and no authority to enforce religious laws upon its believers. Yet, this religious belief unique to Japan has been passed down generation after generation.

HatsumoudeWhen asked whether or not they are religious, most Japanese people claim they do not believe in God or practice religion. However, these same people spend time reflecting the good and bad events at the end of each solar year, and visit a local shrine or temple to mark the start of the New Year.  This visit to the shrine or temple at the beginning of a year is called a Hatsu-Moude (初詣), a ritualistic visit to greet God to express appreciation for being alive to start another year. A majority of the Japanese participate in the Hatsu-Moude with little consciousness that it is a religious event. For most Japanese, religion is practiced in the form of a custom. Interestingly, most of these ‘atheist’ Japanese feel uncomfortable if they do not participate in the Hatsu-Moude, feeling as if they hadn’t taken a bath at the end of a day. Bathing is thought to have associations with Shintoism according to some, and Japanese people express strong passion towards bathing. Perhaps it is because the Japanese climate is abundant with water. In Shintoism the state of Kegare (ケガレ) is detested. Kegare is a state of impurity both physically and spiritually. After a long day of work, it is customary to physically cleanse oneself as well as spiritually replenish through bathing. As Spanish missionary Francis Xavier noted 500 years ago, Japanese people start complaining if they miss one day of bathing. Since centuries ago, Japanese people strongly believed in cleansing themselves.

In the next chapter I would like to talk about the Ise-Jingu. In this chapter let us talk about the Shinto Shrine. Like Christianity has a church, and Islam has a mosque, Shintoism has a Shinto Shrine. There are approximately 90,000 Shinto Shrines throughout Japan. In Japanese characters, the Shinto Shrine is written as 神社, and is pronounced “Jinjya”. In recent years the Jinjya-Honchou (Association of Shinto Shrines), the religious administrative organization that oversees the Shinto Shrines throughout Japan is working to change the English reference of Shintoism’s shrine as “Jinjya”, rather than “Shinto Shrine”. From here, let’s indicate the Shinto Shrine as a Jinjya in respects to the Jinjya-Honchou. This distinction is preferred because the term Jinjya refers to a shrine more local; in comparison to the Jingu, referring to a shrine grander like the Ise-Jingu. This distinction may be easily understood when compared to Catholicism. A local church is like a Jinjya, as the Vatican is like the Ise-Jingu.

ToriiFinding a Jinjya is easy. All one has to do is find a Torii (鳥居), an iconic architectural gate characterized by its vermillion color (rarely some are not painted), the same color as the sun at the center of the Japanese flag. Once one pass through a Torii, they are entering a Jinjya. The Torii symbol can be found on a map, used to indicate the boundary that separates the sacred and the secular world.

On a tangent, I will tell you an interesting story related to the Torii.  A residential neighborhood somewhere in Japan was consistently being littered by mannerless pedestrians. A resident fed up by such behavior half-jokingly crafted and installed a small Torii at the problem site. Suddenly after the Torii was installed, no garbage was found on the neighborhood. Perhaps the litterers felt guilty to scatter their rubbish, or perhaps somebody of good faith decided to pick up the trash because a Torii was standing.

An Oyashiro (社) is the place where the God of that particular Jinjya descends. When one passes through the Torii and walks through the approach and up the stone stair steps, the Oyashiro sits on an elevated ground. The reason why the Oyashiro sits on a raised ground is not clear, but perhaps it is because humanity shares the common belief that God exists in the high heavens. Most Oyashiro are a modest wooden architecture without paint coating.  Inside the Oyashiro is a mirror, the most valuable artifact of the shrine (though some exceptions exist). When one attends to meet God, they are going to the place where the mirror rests. Self-evident from the characteristic of a mirror, visitors to the Oyashiro are praying, making wishes, and saying gratitude to themselves. It is like a conceptual contemporary artwork with a philosophical twist. At certain sites, there are no Oyashiro or other architectural structures within the sacred boundary. Instead, natural objects such as a tree, rock, waterfall, mountain, or even an entire forest is worshiped. These natural objects are referred to as a Goshintai (ご神体). In Japan gods exist everywhere; as rocks, as silverware, and even as toilets.  In Shintoism, God exists within human beings as well, just as the mirror within the Oyashiro indicates. This is very similar to the concept that the Christian God is omnipresent.

Chinjy no MoriIf you have a chance to visit Japan and ride the bullet train, please take a good look when you pass through a rice field.  You may find patches of forests between the fields of rice.  These sites are often a Chinju Forest, a site where a Jinjya exists since ancient times. The Gokoku-Houjou festivals take place at these sites.  The Chinju Forest is known to have exceptionally high bio-diversity from an environmental science perspective. All things existing within the Jinjya is thought to belong to God, and not even a piece of fallen leaf should be taken away. It is a place where ancestors have protected as an inviolable land since the ancient times.

In the process of westernization, Japanese people accepted being called an “economic animal”, and covered their own land with concrete for the sake of modernization. Yet, the Chinju Forest is always kept sacred. God is nature, and nature is God. Sacred sites where human hands may not enter still exists. A Jinjya is a place of nature worship where “existing as is, though time passes by”.

The next article will be the last chapter. We will discuss the “Shikinensengu”, an important event that takes place in Ise-Jingu, the highest ranking Jinjya, along with customs and traditional craft of Japanese people.

Teddy Cookswell
Cultural Facility Designer / Illustrator

- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – - – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

遷宮と日本人
第2章  自然を敬う場所、神社

神道、1.5万年以上前の縄文時代に端を発し、開祖は存在せず、体系立って印刷された教義はなく、強制性がありません。にも関わらず受け継がれている日本特有の土着宗教です。

日本人の多くは神など信じないと否定します。しかし、日本人は年の瀬になると1年を振り返り、「ああ、今年は良い年だった、悪い年だった」と思いを馳せ、新年を迎えると、初詣と言って近くの神社やお寺に行くのです。ほとんどの日本人が行くといわれるこの「初詣」は、近くの神社に新年を迎えられたことを神へ感謝する挨拶で、無宗教と言われる日本人が無意識で行っている宗教行事でもあります。日本人にとって宗教は「風習」という言葉に置き換わっているのかもしれません。 無宗教を自負する多くの日本人は、面白い事に初詣に行かないと落ち着かず、何か風呂に入れなかった1日の終わりの様に居心地の悪さを感じます。国土に水が豊富であるのも幸いし風呂に愛情を注ぐ日本人ですが、これも神道が関係していると言う人もいます。神道では、ケガレを嫌います。ケガレとは精神的にも肉体的にも清潔でない状態の事を表します。一日の労働を終え、明日に向けて精神的なリセットをする為、物理的にも清潔な状態になる様、沐浴の習慣があります。日本人は、一日でも沐浴をしないと不平を守らすと500年前の宣教師ザビエルが書き残している様に、古来から日本人は清潔である事を望むのです。

次回の伊勢神宮のお話の前に、今回は神社の話をしましょう。神社とは、日本の土着宗教である神道の祭祀施設の事です。キリスト教国に教会が、イスラム教国にモスクがあるように、日本全国には、この神社が9万近くあると言われています。英語ではShinto Shrine として表現される神社ですが、ここ近年、日本国の神社本庁は、英語表記にJinja とするよう働きかけているようです。カトリックを例にとると、最寄りの教会が神社、バチカンが伊勢神宮と考えていただけると分かり易いのかもしれません。

神社を見つけるのは簡単です。日本をイメージするアイコンの一つである「鳥居」があればそこから先は神社です。日本国旗の太陽と同じ、朱色に塗られた(塗られていないものもあります)門の事です。この鳥居は、地図上にも神社の記号として表記されますが、ここから先は神の領域ですよ、というサインです。

話はそれますが、鳥居の面白いお話をしましょう。住宅街のある所で、心ない人達によりゴミが捨てられる様になりました。そこで、ある人が面白半分で自作の小さな鳥居を作り設置しました。ごみを捨てる人が躊躇したのか、それとも鳥居があるので心ある人がゴミを拾う様になったのかは分かりませんが、その後ぱったりとゴミ捨てが無くなったそうです。

鳥居をくぐり参道を抜けると、神は天高い所に居ると言う人類が無意識でシェアしている概念からでしょうか、お社(神の降臨する場所)は高台にあります。石の階段を登って行くと、多くのお社は、塗装すらされていない質素な木製の建物です。例外もありますが、その慎ましやかな建物の中には、一番大切なものとして「鏡」が置かれています。神に会いに行くと鏡が置いてあるのです。その鏡の存在が示す様に、お祈りやお願い事をするのは自分自身であり、その結果に感謝するのも自分自身であるのかもしれません。それはまるで、哲学を含蓄したコンセプチャルな現代美術の様です。また、場所によっては神社の中に入っても建物はなく、滝、岩、巨木、そして森や山自体がご神体として祀られている神社もあります。日本では、道ばたの石、食器、トイレ、神は至る所に遍在しています。鏡が記す様に、それは人間、個人個人にさえも。キリスト教の神は偏在するという概念に似ています。

もし、日本に来られる機会があり、新幹線に乗って旅をされる時は、田園地域を通過する際に目を凝らしてみて下さい。広がる田んぼの所々に、こんもりとした森を見つける事が出来ます。大抵それらの場所は「鎮守の森」と言って、古くから続く神社がある場所です。五穀豊穣を祝う村祭りもここで開催されます。この鎮守の森は、自然科学の見地から考察しても生物の多様性を育む重要な場所でもあるのです。鳥居から入った聖域のものは、神様のものですから落ち葉一枚でも、持ち帰る事は良しとされていません。太古の昔から土地土地の先祖が不可侵として守ってきたものなのです。

西洋化を導入し、エコノミックアニマルと称されそれを否定せず、利便を追求した結果国土をコンクリで固めてしまった日本人ですが、鎮守の森には絶対に手を出しません。神とは自然であり、自然とは神であり、絶対に手を触れてはならないという聖域は健在のようです。神社とは「時は過ぎても、あるがままにある」自然崇拝の場であるとも言えるでしょう。

さて、次回は最終回です。日本の神社の頂点に存在する伊勢神宮で行われる行事、「式年遷宮」から、日本人の習慣、伝統工芸などに関してお届けします。

テディ・クックスウェル
文化施設デザイナー / イラストレーター